Two hands in blue Tunisian crocheted gloves holding a coffee cup, slightly backlit.

Ribbling Mitts

Don’t know how I missed it, but I have recently discovered Ribblr, a crochet, knitting, sewing and Tunisian crochet crafting platform with a new form of interactive e-pattern that translates, highlights, and lets you mark off your progress. I’ve already transferred two of my patterns into e-patterns on Ribblr, which you can find in my Ribblr shop.

In my exploring around this new platform, I came across a very cool pair of gloves made in Tunisian crochet. I had never seen Tunisian crochet used for anything other than a blanket, so I immediately set about finding a yarn to create the gloves.

This pattern is Perfect Fingerless Gloves by Hayley Joanne Robinson. It’s currently free at the time of this posting.

A pair of blue Tunisian crocheted gloves lay on a laptop keyboard. One is dark blue with a light blue thumb and the other is light blue with a dark blue thumb.

I had two colors of Knit Picks Comfy yarn that complemented each other, but neither were enough to make a full pair. So I decided instead to make each glove in one of the colors and add the other color in for the thumb so it’s a coordinating pair.

The only modifications I made were the color change in the thumbs and slip stitching the seams instead of sewing them.

Two hands in blue Tunisian crocheted gloves holding a coffee cup, slightly backlit.

I’d say this pattern is great if you are looking to learn more Tunisian crochet. It was super easy to follow and perfect for a beginner.

I know a lot of us are not using Ravelry right now, so if you are looking for a new way to buy or sell patterns, go check out Ribblr. Their pattern editor is super easy to use, so it might even be an easier way to start designing and selling patterns if you have been intimidated by figuring out how to write patterns.


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A Year-long Quest for Shorts

Yes, once again demonstrating a flair for dramatics with that title. But I also made 4 pairs of shorts in about a month after putting it off for a full year.

You see, my mom was frustrated with the lack of non-denim shorts in stores about a year ago. Seems a strange thing to be looking for in February now that I am sitting here in March in less than 50 degree weather, but perhaps I put off making that first pair of shorts as well and she was actually looking for shorts in the summer. Now that I think of it, that’s probably what it actually was.

Anyway, I set about to draft a pattern and quickly got bored of that idea. So I found a commercial pattern I could tinker with instead. (McCall’s M6930 if you are also looking for one. I used option A but shortened the inseam a bit.) I was able to combine two sizes to get them to fit the way she wanted, not to mention they have actual, functional pockets instead of the fake pockets women’s shorts usually have.

I made the first version as a test out of the fabric she had the most of, but for those I used some snaps I had in my stash instead of those slider buttons pants usually have. That turned out to be a mistake, because they continually pop open, but by waiting a year until things opened up a bit more I was able to get the actual hardware I needed for the “real” shorts.

I am thinking of once again taking the easy road and modifying the pattern for myself to make some short leggings for under dresses this summer. Or it might just be easier to draft my own pattern for those. We’ll see. I still have a dress in pieces hanging out in my sewing bin that I should probably finish first.


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Sweater Weather

Well, okay, it’s not the same as sweater weather anywhere else. Which is why my new sweater is an open-weave crocheted sweater made in a sport weight cotton yarn.

A woman wears a green crocheted sweater and blue camouflage leggings standing in front of a green and white wave painting on a white wall.

The pattern is The Betty Boyfriend Sweater by Natalia McHayle (@taliacrochetcreations on Instagram) and the yarn is Cotton Pure in Linden Green from Purl Soho.

Back view of a woman wearing a green crocheted sweater and blue camouflage leggings standing in front of a green and white wave painting on a white wall.

The pattern is super easy and quick to work up. I finished it within four days, including sewing seams and adding the ribbing. Somewhere along the sleeves I accidentally added 10 rounds, which worked out nicely because I like my sleeves to end either above my wrist or in the middle of my hand.

Close up of the side seam detail of a green crochet sweater near the bottom edge ribbing.

The sweater is made in two flat panels that are then seamed up the sides and at the shoulders. You add the sleeves working back and forth in the round, which I totally missed the first time through. It’s not only written in the notes, but the joins are written in the instructions, too. I just happened to miss it both places until I was at the end of the first sleeve and realized there was no instruction telling me to seam it. I have a habit of messing up the first time through on a sleeve, though. Really would like to break that habit, honestly.

Close up of the neck ribbing detail of a green crocheted sweater

You add the ribbing on the sleeves, neckline, and bottom edge perpendicular to the edge and seam it when you get back to the beginning.

Close up of the shoulder seam detail on a green crocheted sweater.

The yarn is a dream to work with, too. I had a full ball left and ended up making a bag and a belt from it. My hands don’t really get fatigued when working with cotton yarns like some people do, but this one is very soft and shouldn’t give you too much problem if yours do. It’s even machine washable. These pictures are straight out of the dryer. It is so nice against the skin when wearing the sweater, too. I couldn’t wait to wear it today to take these pictures, and am planning to actually wear it again tomorrow. More detail available on my Ravelry project page.


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