Mitts (Perhaps a Bit Late)

I had the grand notion of making mitts for all the kids for Christmas. You probably know where this story is going by now. Had the yarn, didn’t have the time, continued making them now. I started the first, smallest pair on December 22, and then left them to sit in a drawer until about last week.

Once I actually got started working on them, it took less than a day for the baby size. I don’t think it was much longer for the bigger ones to fit a small child. These are just basic mitts, 2×2 rib on the bottom and top, stockinette in the middle with a slit thumb worked back and forth.

Exact recipe for the baby mitts (ages 2ish-3ish):
Materials:
– Knit Picks Stroll Sock Yarn
– Size 1.5 (2.5mm) and 2.5 (3.0mm) circular or double point needles
Gauge
9 stitches x 10 rows = 1 inch in Stockinette Stitch
Instructions
1. Cast on 52 stitches. Join to work in the round.
2. Knit 2 Purl 2 rib for 1.25 inches.
3. Change color and work 3 rows stockinette (Knit all stitches).
4. Switch to knitting flat, slipping the first stitch of each row (knit one row, turn at end and purl back, turn again and knit, etc.) for 1 inch.
5. Rejoin in the round and knit for .5 inches.
6. Change to ribbing color, knit 1 round.
7. Knit 2 Purl 2 rib for .5 inches.
8. Bind off using Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-off or any other bind-off that will stretch with the ribbing.

As you can see, the big kid’s (ages 4ish-6ish) version isn’t much different, just larger proportions:
Instructions
1. Cast on 60 stitches. Join to work in the round.
2. Knit 2 Purl 2 rib for 1.5 inches.
3. Change color and work 5 rows stockinette (Knit all stitches).
4. Switch to knitting flat, slipping the first stitch of each row (knit one row, turn at end and purl back, turn again and knit, etc.) for 1.5 inch.
5. Rejoin in the round and knit for .75 inches.
6. Change to ribbing color, knit 1 round.
7. Knit 2 Purl 2 rib for .75 inches.
8. Bind off using Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-off or any other bind-off that will stretch with the ribbing.

As always, if you make these, leave a comment with a link to pictures. I love to see everyone else’s take on things like this. Also, do you have a favorite glove/mitten pattern? What is your policy on Christmas presents that don’t get finished/given for Christmas? Do you just give it whenever, or do you hold it over until the next Christmas/gift-giving opportunity?

DIY Friday: Growing Rib Hat

This year when we did Operation Christmas Child boxes I thought it would be nice to include some hand knit hats since I have a lot of yarn lying around. Since I was going to be making hats for boys and girls to go with three different age groups, I wanted to make a pattern that would work for anyone.I came up with this Growing Rib Hat (click to find on Ravelry) that has an increasing rib pattern for each size.

I made one for the oldest girl with a white body and blue trim, and the two younger girls got blue hats with white trim. The boys each got black hats, because that is probably the easiest color to give to the boys.

The pattern is written to use just the simple Red Heart yarn you can find at pretty much any store, but you can just as easily substitute any size 4 yarn. For the oldest girl’s hat I actually used a sport weight yarn doubled to get nearly the same gauge.

More info on each hat can be found on the Ravelry project pages:
Pre-teen Boy
Elementary-age Boy
Toddler Boy
Pre-teen Girl
Elementary-age Girl
Toddler Girl

DIY Friday: One-Day Armwarmers

Remember my friend who really likes purple? Well, her birthday was at the end of October. I still had (have) a ridiculous amount of that yarn, so I worked up a quick pair of armwarmers that, as the title states, only took a day to make. In fact, it took less than a day because I stopped working on it to go shopping for a few hours.

I’m not going to post the whole pattern in the body of this post, but click here to download the pattern in PDF format.

The gloves have knit 2, purl 2 ribbing at the top and the bottom, with the body worked in stockinette with shaping so it isn’t as bulky at the wrist as if it were knit straight. There is a thumb gusset, and the instructions for opposite gussets are included. But you could just as easily make the two gloves with the gusset on the same side because there is no patterning on either side. But making the gussets on opposite sides of the gloves makes it easier to keep track of while working both at the same time. At least it worked that way for me.

If you make these, let me know. I would love to see pictures. You can find the info on this pattern here on Ravelry. Also, let me know if you have any trouble with downloading, or notice any errors in the pattern.

400 Stitches in 60 Days (Take Two)

Okay, let me try this again.

I recently got the book 400 Knitting Stitches as a resource for my knitting. As I started looking through all the different stitch patterns, I saw many cool patterns I wanted to try. With way too many random piles of leftover acrylic yarns I don’t want to use for any other projects, I decided to turn this book into a project.

I’m casting on somewhere around 21 stitches for each (depending on the number of stitches needed for the pattern), including 4 edge stitches (2 on each side). Obviously there is going to be some variation in the sizes. Once I’m done I’ll stitch them together into blankets for Project Linus.

As the title implies, I’m going to attempt to do this in just 2 months. I started on March 29, so I hope to be done making the squares by May 28. Then I will start the blanket-making process, hopefully getting done within a week or so. Because I don’t want to be making blankets in the middle of summer, even kid-sized blankets.

When I first came up with the idea for this, I thought I’d post the pictures of the ones I’d done every day. Not going to happen. But the photos of all the squares can be found in this album, updated frequently.

Keeping It Clean – Washcloth Pattern

I LOVE cotton knit washcloths. I love making them, and I love using them. To me, they get dishes cleaner than regular washcloths, plus they can pick up more messes around the kitchen. And I make plenty of messes around the kitchen.

I’ve made washcloths many different ways, but I think I like this straight knit version the best. It knits up quickly and works really well with self-striping yarns. Plus, you can create whatever pattern in the center you want, like this heart:

Want to make one? You’ll need a pair of size 8 knitting needles and worsted weight 100% cotton yarn.

*These instructions are for the plain cloth, but you can create your own chart for the inner pattern in whatever design. The inner part is about 38 stitches by 54 rows.*

Cast on 46 stitches. Knit 3 rows.

Row 4: Knit 3, yarn over, slip 1 stitch, knit 2 together, pass slipped stitch over,* yarn over, knit 2 together* repeat to last 6 stitches, yarn over, slip 1 stitch, knit 2 together, pass slipped stitch over, yarn over, knit 3

Row 5: Knit 3, purl 19 stitches, increase 1, purl to last 3 stitches, knit 3

Row 6: Knit 3, yarn over, knit 2 together, knit to last 5 stitches, slip 2 stitches knit wise and knit together, yarn over, knit 3

Row 7: Knit 3, purl to last 3 stitches, knit 3

Repeat rows 6&7 until piece measures 1 inch less than desired length (for mine, I ended at 9 inches).

Repeat row 4.

Knit 3 rows, increasing 1 in the middle of the first row only. Bind off. Weave in ends.

If you just like using these washcloths but don’t want to make one yourself, I offer them in many colors on my Etsy site.

If you make one and post pictures, let me know! I would love to see other versions.

What kind of household items do you prefer to make yourself instead of using store-bought? What colors or patterns would you like to see in a washcloth?