Finished Object – Waterfall Scarf

A green, blue, orange, and red knit scarf with dropped stitch details draped around the neck of a green, adjustable dress form.

And here is the first finished object of 2023 – a Waterfall Scarf. I found this pattern in my 101 Designer One-Skein Wonders book, and it is designed by Linda O’Leary.

A green, orange, red, and blue knit scarf with dropped stitch details hanging over a white door.

Despite it being from a book specifically designed for projects that use a single skein of yarn, I still bought 2 of the Caron Cotton Cakes to make sure I had enough yarn. Obviously it was not only enough, but probably enough for 5 of these. I’m turning the rest into a hat… or two (or three).

Close up of a blue section of the scarf to show the detail of the knit stitches.

Since the details are created by lines of dropped stitches, it made for a quick knit because it was just knitting every row. Even though it didn’t really, dropping the stitches at the end almost felt like it took as along as the knitting.

Full Details:

-Yarn: 120 grams of Caron Cotton Cakes in Peach Blossom

-Needle: Size US10 (6mm)

-Finished dimensions: 6 inches wide, 101 inches long


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I Conquered the Triangle

This Christmas gift was a real doozie. Considering I just finished it, you can probably imagine.

I started a week or two before Christmas, so it was doomed as a gift. But I was overly optimistic as one is so close to Christmas with so many things in the works. So I cast on an amount of stitches that was close to the pattern, seeing as how I was using slightly different yarn, and got to work. Around the end of the first ball of white, I knew there was going to be a problem in how much yarn I had, so I ordered two more colors of gray to get more of a gradient.

I wrapped up the progress on the white, along with the ball of gray yarn I had and the black yarn. I tossed them in a bag with a “loading” tag and gave that on Christmas morning. Then I had to wait another week for the other colors to show up. Once I got those, I kept plugging away. But I wasn’t getting very many rows out of each color.

I ignored the thoughts in my head that told me it wasn’t going to work as it was and kept going. By the time I got to the black, I had ordered three more balls of it to make sure I would have enough. It would be very bottom-heavy color-wise, but I told myself it would work. Until I got a few yards from the end of ball 4.

I did some calculations this time and worked my way from the bottom up to make sure I would have enough yarn. You know, something I should’ve done in the first place. But, you know, hindsight and whatever. I pulled the yarn from the original attempt as I worked. That way I didn’t have to unravel the whole thing at once, or deal with all those balls of yarn again.

I finally finished it last week. Two-and-a-half months past Christmas, but who’s counting. The point is, it is done and wearable. And I may sit down and write that up as kind of pattern/tutorial. Perhaps even with some videos, since I went backward to the way entrelac is usually executed.

Everything Is Not What It Seems

You would think I would get better at estimating how long things take, considering I’ve been knitting for over ten years. Seriously, I should be better at this. But I have managed to mess up a straightforward triangular entrelac shawl several times, but I got a beaded one finished in a quarter of that time. You would think the beaded one would’ve been more difficult.

I’ve made so many of these, I went for something a little different on the picture. So here is Dinosaur modeling this one. It is a Starry Stole from Knitpicks, worked in Shadow yarn in the Midnight colorway with silver-lined, clear beads. As I have done on all the others, I added a third full repeat to make it more scarf-length.

I’m finally re-doing the christmas scarf, hopefully to be done with it soon. That one may turn into a bit of a tutorial. It sure has taught me quite a few things.